Wien, 2. Juli 1906

Sehr geehrter Herr! 1

Da der Beisp. 173 nicht zum Haupttext, sondern zur Fußnote gehört, so ist es notwendig, dies auch äußerlich kenntlich zu machen. 2 Ich bitte daher, den Herrn Setzer aufmerksam zu machen, daß dieses Arrangement sehr leicht durchzuführen ist, indem die letzten 3 Zeilen des Haupttextes S. 220 auf die S nächste Seite 221 transportiert, 3 u. vom Haupttext des S. 224 ja ein paar Zeilen für an S. 222 u. 223 abgegegeben werden, während die Anmerkung unter dem Strich fortläuft. 4


Mit bestem Dank
Ihr ergeb.
[signed:] H Schenker

© Transcription Ian Bent, 2005, 2017


Vienna, July 2, 1906

Dear Sir, 1

Since music example 173 belongs not to the main text but to the footnote, it is necessary to make this crystal clear. 2 I should like therefore to draw the type-setter's attention to the fact that this layout can be effected very easily by moving the last three lines of main text from p. 220 to the following page, 221, 3 and shifting a few lines from the main text of p.224 back to pp. 222 and 223, and letting the footnote flow on continuously beneath the line. 4


With many thanks,
Your devoted
[signed:] H. Schenker

© Translation Ian Bent, 2005, 2017


Wien, 2. Juli 1906

Sehr geehrter Herr! 1

Da der Beisp. 173 nicht zum Haupttext, sondern zur Fußnote gehört, so ist es notwendig, dies auch äußerlich kenntlich zu machen. 2 Ich bitte daher, den Herrn Setzer aufmerksam zu machen, daß dieses Arrangement sehr leicht durchzuführen ist, indem die letzten 3 Zeilen des Haupttextes S. 220 auf die S nächste Seite 221 transportiert, 3 u. vom Haupttext des S. 224 ja ein paar Zeilen für an S. 222 u. 223 abgegegeben werden, während die Anmerkung unter dem Strich fortläuft. 4


Mit bestem Dank
Ihr ergeb.
[signed:] H Schenker

© Transcription Ian Bent, 2005, 2017


Vienna, July 2, 1906

Dear Sir, 1

Since music example 173 belongs not to the main text but to the footnote, it is necessary to make this crystal clear. 2 I should like therefore to draw the type-setter's attention to the fact that this layout can be effected very easily by moving the last three lines of main text from p. 220 to the following page, 221, 3 and shifting a few lines from the main text of p.224 back to pp. 222 and 223, and letting the footnote flow on continuously beneath the line. 4


With many thanks,
Your devoted
[signed:] H. Schenker

© Translation Ian Bent, 2005, 2017

Footnotes

1 Writing of this letter is not recorded in Schenker's diary.

2 Ex. 173 quotes the Max Reger Piano Quintet, Op.64 in score, and belongs to footnote 1, beginning on p. 220 and continuing through to p. 226. (The footnote is entirely omitted from the published English translation, the corresponding place in which is p.174, line 9 at the phrase "step progression.") The footnote, which is preceded by a remark in the main text that modern music is at fault in lacking the scale-degree, reads as follows:

"As a deterrent example, I give below the opening of the Quintet Op. 64 by a modern composer. — This opening is by far the most shapely passage in the first movement ‒ what follows is exponentially more confused. But I ask: Do we really hear C minor, or is it not more likely Eę major? What in particular do measures 6‒8 signify in themselves and in relation to the whole? It's not just that the succession of harmonies is hard to understand (here it is ‒ considered from the standpoint of Eę major/minor ‒ something like the following: I ę3, ęII[phrygian], ‒ IV and lastly II Ě3 as if it wanted to go to the dominant. It raises the question: What is this succession of scale-degrees trying to say? Where has it come from? Where is it headed? In what way do these scale-degrees serve the alleged main key of C minor? And how does this acquired Eę major/minor stand in relation to C minor?
What is the solution to this problem? There is none. There isn't a passage in the whole work that informs us of the main key; only with difficulty does what ensues relate to what precedes it; and when by chance such a relationship emerges, it is too feeble, too trivial, too brief. [There is] no plan to the keys, no plan to the foreground keys ‒ all merely one singular big, irrationally proceeding mass. — And people in the German lands are preparing seriously to celebrate a composer such as this, who is devoid of all musical instincts, as a "master of musical composition" ‒ a few years after the death of Brahms ‒ Oh, what indolence on the part of the German public, what cowardliness on the part of writers and the powerful in the world of music!

(Despite the anonymity adopted here, the music example is clearly captioned "Max Reger, Quintet, Op. 64.") — See also CA 1-2, November 8, 1905, paragraph 4, for reference to Reger in his initial proposal to Cotta.

3 The proof must have had five lines of main text on p.220, since it now has two before the footnote begins.

4 "Strich" ("line"): the short horizontal rule separating the main text from the footnote on all seven pages. The footnote text continues through to p.224, the example to p.226.

Commentary

Rights Holder
Heirs of Henrich Schenker, deemed to be in the public domain.
License
All reasonable steps have been taken to locate the heirs of Heinrich Schenker. Any claim to intellectual rights on this document should be addressed to the Schenker Correspondence Project, Faculty of Music, University of Cambridge, at schenkercorrespondence [at] mus (dot) cam (dot) ac (dot) uk.
Format
1p letter, Bogen format, holograph salutation, message, valediction, and signature
Provenance
J.G. Cotta’sche Nachfolger/Stuttgarter Zeitung (document date-c.1954); Cotta-Archiv (Stiftung der Stuttgarter Zeitung), Schiller-Nationalmuseum, Marbach am Neckar, Germany (c.1954-)

Digital version created: 2017-06-27
Last updated: 2012-11-02