Ser. A, {145}

August 1911

2. 8.

Im Marokkostreit zwischen Frankr. u. Deutschland 1 ein schönes Wort des Präsid. Dr. Sylvester (Abgeordnetenhaus) gegen die Präpotenz Englands gerichtet: „das Mittelmeer seinen Anrainern“! So treffend u. groß das Wort, um so größte leider noch die Ohnmacht Österr.'s u. Italiens, dessen Tendenz zu verwirklichen!

© Transcription Ian Bent, 2019

Ser. A, {145}

August 1911

August 2

In the dispute between France and Germany over Morocco, 1 a clever turn of phrase by the President, Dr. Sylvester (Chamber of Deputies), was directed against the superior might of England: "The Mediterranean to those who live along it"! As fitting and great as the phrase is, all the greater still, sadly, is the powerlessness of Austria and Italy to realize its intentions.

© Translation Ian Bent, 2019

Ser. A, {145}

August 1911

2. 8.

Im Marokkostreit zwischen Frankr. u. Deutschland 1 ein schönes Wort des Präsid. Dr. Sylvester (Abgeordnetenhaus) gegen die Präpotenz Englands gerichtet: „das Mittelmeer seinen Anrainern“! So treffend u. groß das Wort, um so größte leider noch die Ohnmacht Österr.'s u. Italiens, dessen Tendenz zu verwirklichen!

© Transcription Ian Bent, 2019

Ser. A, {145}

August 1911

August 2

In the dispute between France and Germany over Morocco, 1 a clever turn of phrase by the President, Dr. Sylvester (Chamber of Deputies), was directed against the superior might of England: "The Mediterranean to those who live along it"! As fitting and great as the phrase is, all the greater still, sadly, is the powerlessness of Austria and Italy to realize its intentions.

© Translation Ian Bent, 2019

Footnotes

1 The rivalry between France and Germany at the beginning of the 20th century for influence in Morocco resulted in the First Moroccan Crisis of 1905–08 and then to the Second Morocco Crisis (or Agadir Crisis) of 1911, after the German emperor had ordered a gunship to the port of Agadir on July 1 following the French occupation of Fes and Rabat. The British became involved in the negotiations. A French‒German accord was forged on 4 November. Schenker's diary of August 9, 1914 makes a bellicose remark about the outcome.