[The original of this letter is in English.]


8109–20th Ave.
Brooklyn, N.Y.
April 8, 1933

Dear Dr. [Schenker]: 1

Perrmit me firstly to acknowledge receipt of your very kind and courteous letter. 2 I must, however, in the same breath, ask your leniency and graciousness in believing that it was not mere thoughtlessness and lack of consideration on my part in not responding any sooner. The fact is that Dr. Weisse, who has been the soul of kindness and generosity, and I have been discussing up to date the advisability of my commencing work now or waiting a few months for better economic conditions on the outside or at least until that condensed version of your work has been fully prepared (as you mentioned in your letter). 3

The conclusion that Dr. Weisse and I have reached as to the best plan to follow, is to translate certain sections of your works, individually, and publish them if possible as separate articles in an accepted widely circulated music magazine. 4 This would have the result of building up interest and demands for your works in this country, following which I could then translate your larger works in book form.

I sincerely regret that I have not {2} more definite news for you at this time, but I should like to give you my complete assurance that I shall not proceed one step without the advice, recommendation, and complete approval of Dr. Weisse.

It is my hope that this letter finds you enjoying the very best of health and well-being- and I look forward enthusiastically to the world-wide recognition of your work which your genius merits.


Very respectfully
[signed:] [unsigned]
[signed:] Frederick E. Auslander

© Transcription Robert Wason, 2007

© Translation

[The original of this letter is in English.]


8109–20th Ave.
Brooklyn, N.Y.
April 8, 1933

Dear Dr. [Schenker]: 1

Perrmit me firstly to acknowledge receipt of your very kind and courteous letter. 2 I must, however, in the same breath, ask your leniency and graciousness in believing that it was not mere thoughtlessness and lack of consideration on my part in not responding any sooner. The fact is that Dr. Weisse, who has been the soul of kindness and generosity, and I have been discussing up to date the advisability of my commencing work now or waiting a few months for better economic conditions on the outside or at least until that condensed version of your work has been fully prepared (as you mentioned in your letter). 3

The conclusion that Dr. Weisse and I have reached as to the best plan to follow, is to translate certain sections of your works, individually, and publish them if possible as separate articles in an accepted widely circulated music magazine. 4 This would have the result of building up interest and demands for your works in this country, following which I could then translate your larger works in book form.

I sincerely regret that I have not {2} more definite news for you at this time, but I should like to give you my complete assurance that I shall not proceed one step without the advice, recommendation, and complete approval of Dr. Weisse.

It is my hope that this letter finds you enjoying the very best of health and well-being- and I look forward enthusiastically to the world-wide recognition of your work which your genius merits.


Very respectfully
[signed:] [unsigned]
[signed:] Frederick E. Auslander

© Transcription Robert Wason, 2007

© Translation

Footnotes

1 Receipt of this letter is recorded in Schenker's diary at OJ 4/6, p. 3828, April 24, 1933: "Von Herrn Ausländer (Br. aus New York): Dank; will Partieen in Musik-Magazinen veröffentlichen!" ("From Mr. Auslander (letter from New York): thanks; he wants to publish extracts in music magazines!").

2 This letter is not known to survive. The writing of a letter dated January 28, 1933 was recorded in Schenker's diary at OJ 4/6, p. 3808: "An Ausländer Auslander(Br.): seine Wärme erwidere ich mit Vertrauen, mache Vorschläge." ("To foreigner Auslander (letter): I reply to his warm wishes with trust; I make suggestions."). (Schenker is punning on Auslander's name.)

3 This certainly refers to events of late 1932, when Joseph Marx suggested to Schenker that he have a "student edition" of his Harmonielehre made for use in the Vienna Academy, at which point Schenker contacted Vrieslander, and discussion between Schenker, Vrieslander and Universal Edition continued well into 1933 (OC 18/5‒23). See R. Wason, "From Harmonielehre to Harmony ...," in Martin Eybl & Evelyn Fink-Mennel, eds. Schenker-Traditionen: Eine Wiener Schule der Musiktheorie und ihre internationale Verbreitung (Vienna: Böhlau Verlag, 2006), pp. 155‒201.

4 No such translation articles were ever published. It is interesting that Arthur Waldeck and Nathan Broder came to the same conclusion after Waldeck's unsuccessful attempt to secure support for his translation of Schenker's Harmonielehre (cf. OC 18/36). Given Hans Weisse's involvement with both Auslander and Waldeck, one wonders if he recommended this course of action to both.

Commentary

Format
2p letter, Bogen format, carbon copy, typewritten salutation, message, valediction and signature (no holograph signature)
Rights Holder
Heirs or representatives of Frederick Auslander
License
Permission being sought; any claim to intellectual rights on this document should be addressed to Schenker Documents Online, Faculty of Music, University of Cambridge, at schenkercorrespondence[at]mus(dot)cam(dot)ac(dot)uk
Provenance
Schenker, Heinrich (document date-1935)--Schenker, Jeanette (1935-1938)--Oster, Ernst (1938-c.1939)—New York Public Library (c.1939-)

Digital version created: 2018-10-26
Last updated: 2010-04-23