Hamburg, 16. Juni 29.

Liebster H.! 1

Ich denke viel u. Gott lenkt noch viel mehr mit mir. Ich hatte schon alle Dispositionen getroffen u. wollte auf 14 Tage nach Galtür kommen. Karli, der sich über den Tod Prof. Schreiers 2 sehr aufregte, legte sich mit einer kleinen Nierenentzündung zu Bette. Es verläuft gottlob sehr gut u. ich hoffe daß er in 8 Tagen auf’s Land fahren kann. Aus Aberglauben u. aus dem Grunde meiner u. Vallys Schonung, muss ich dieses Zeichen ernst wahrnehmen u. – – verzichten. Ich wäre zu nervös. Jeder verspätete Brief wäre mir eine Qual. In meiner Gesellschaft wird er sich auch eher ruhig verhalten, was er jedenfalls in nächster Zeit tun muss. Ich halte den Kopf hoch, denn wieder winken als Hoffnung Herbstferien oder spätestens Weihnachten, da komme ich dann ausführlicher nach Wien. Wann fährst Du? Seid Ihr gesund? Ich fahre am 27ten dann nach Hohe Geiß im Harz (650m)[.] Dort werde ich mich, wenn alles glatt geht [continuing in left margin, top to bottom:] auch ganz gut erholen können.


Innigst grüßen wir Euch!
Ganz Dein
[signed:] Floriz

© Transcription William Drabkin, 2013


Hamburg, June 16, 1929

Dearest Heinrich, 1

I think a great deal, and God still guides me ever more. I had met all my obligations and wanted to come to Galtür for a fortnight. Little Karl, who was very upset by the death of Professor Schreier, 2 was in bed with a minor inflammation of the kidney. It passed very well, thank goodness, and I hope that he will be able to get out to the countryside in a week's time. On account of superstition, and to spare myself and Vally, I must take this sign seriously and – – say no. I would be too nervous. Every delayed letter would be a torture for me. In my company, he will also be more likely to behave calmly, something that he must at any rate do in the immediate future. I hold my head high, since the autumn holiday or, at the latest, Christmas beckons me; then I could spend more time in Vienna. When will you be leaving? Are the two of you in good health? I am leaving on the 27th to Hohegeiß in the Harz Mountains (650 meters above sea level). There, if everything goes smoothly, I shall [continuing in left margin, top to bottom:] also be able to restore my health quite well.


We greet the two of you most affectionately.
Ever yours,
[signed:] Floriz

© Translation William Drabkin, 2013


Hamburg, 16. Juni 29.

Liebster H.! 1

Ich denke viel u. Gott lenkt noch viel mehr mit mir. Ich hatte schon alle Dispositionen getroffen u. wollte auf 14 Tage nach Galtür kommen. Karli, der sich über den Tod Prof. Schreiers 2 sehr aufregte, legte sich mit einer kleinen Nierenentzündung zu Bette. Es verläuft gottlob sehr gut u. ich hoffe daß er in 8 Tagen auf’s Land fahren kann. Aus Aberglauben u. aus dem Grunde meiner u. Vallys Schonung, muss ich dieses Zeichen ernst wahrnehmen u. – – verzichten. Ich wäre zu nervös. Jeder verspätete Brief wäre mir eine Qual. In meiner Gesellschaft wird er sich auch eher ruhig verhalten, was er jedenfalls in nächster Zeit tun muss. Ich halte den Kopf hoch, denn wieder winken als Hoffnung Herbstferien oder spätestens Weihnachten, da komme ich dann ausführlicher nach Wien. Wann fährst Du? Seid Ihr gesund? Ich fahre am 27ten dann nach Hohe Geiß im Harz (650m)[.] Dort werde ich mich, wenn alles glatt geht [continuing in left margin, top to bottom:] auch ganz gut erholen können.


Innigst grüßen wir Euch!
Ganz Dein
[signed:] Floriz

© Transcription William Drabkin, 2013


Hamburg, June 16, 1929

Dearest Heinrich, 1

I think a great deal, and God still guides me ever more. I had met all my obligations and wanted to come to Galtür for a fortnight. Little Karl, who was very upset by the death of Professor Schreier, 2 was in bed with a minor inflammation of the kidney. It passed very well, thank goodness, and I hope that he will be able to get out to the countryside in a week's time. On account of superstition, and to spare myself and Vally, I must take this sign seriously and – – say no. I would be too nervous. Every delayed letter would be a torture for me. In my company, he will also be more likely to behave calmly, something that he must at any rate do in the immediate future. I hold my head high, since the autumn holiday or, at the latest, Christmas beckons me; then I could spend more time in Vienna. When will you be leaving? Are the two of you in good health? I am leaving on the 27th to Hohegeiß in the Harz Mountains (650 meters above sea level). There, if everything goes smoothly, I shall [continuing in left margin, top to bottom:] also be able to restore my health quite well.


We greet the two of you most affectionately.
Ever yours,
[signed:] Floriz

© Translation William Drabkin, 2013

Footnotes

1 Receipt of this letter is not recorded in Schenker's diary; it was probably received on June 19, when Schenker sent Violin a postcard, presumably in reply (diary entry at OJ 4/2, p. 3348): "An Violin (K.): Wünsche für den Sommer." ("To Violin (postcard): best wishes for the summer.")

2 Prof. Schreier: perhaps one of the doctors who had been looking after Violin's son Karl.

Commentary

Format
1p letter, holograph message and signature
Provenance
Schenker, Heinrich (document date-1935)--Schenker, Jeanette (1935-c.1942)--Ratz, Erwin (c.1942-c.1945)--Jonas, Oswald (c.1945-1978)--University of California, Riverside (1978--)
Rights Holder
Heirs of Moriz Violin, reproduced here by kind permission
License
Permission to publish granted by the heirs of Moriz Violin, June 25, 2006. Any claim to intellectual rights on this document should be addressed to the Schenker Correspondence Project, Faculty of Music, University of Cambridge, at schenkercorrespondence [at] mus (dot) cam (dot) ac (dot) uk

Digital version created: 2013-07-15
Last updated: 2013-07-15