Mein lieber Herr van Hoboken ! 1

Gleichzeitig geht an Sie die Brahms-Studie ab u. ich nehme auch hier die Gelegenheit wahr, Ihnen herzlichst für Ihre Beihilfe zu danken, im ideelen wie materiellen Sinn verstanden! Den großen Dank statte ich erst im „freien Satz,“ laut u. feierlich ab, wie er sich gebührt ‒ doch bis dahin wird noch eine gewisse Zeit verstreichen.

Die Überraschung, die ich Ihnen ankündigte, 2 erfährt eine Verzögerung, gegen die ich keine {2} Mittel habe, sie kommt aber bestimmt. Dann gebe ich Ihnen die Frkf Beilage 3 zurück.

Selbst an Brahms gemessen ist sein 8-8- u. 5-5 Monolog wirklich nicht als eine nur bescheidene Leistung u. Unterhaltung zu bezeichnen, auch zu diesen 11 Seiten gehörte sein Genie, die Lust u. die Kraft der Ausführung seines Genies, u. meine eigene Leistung der Erklärung, im rechten Abstand von Brahms gedacht, nimmt auch, trotz nur 9 Spalten, auch unter meinen größeren Werken einen würdigen Platz ein.

Dagagen viel, viel bescheidener hielt ich meine „Erinnerungen an Brahms 4 (für München). Die große Gestalt des Meisters hielt meine Feder bei jeder Silbe in demutigster Entfernung. {3} So winzig die Veranlassungen gewesen sein mögen, so waren doch seine Worte zu mir doch Worte von Br., ganz unscheinbare, u. doch irgendwie aufhellend, führend, wie sonst ein Musiker sie nicht im Munde zu führen gewohnt ist, namentlich in der Bedeutung nicht, die Br. aus Kunsterfahrung selbst ihnen beimaß.

Hoffentlich lassen Sie sich wirklich im Mai bei uns sehen! Bei mir sollen Sie eine schöne Sammlung von Stoffen für Sie finden, über vieles Andere, wie z. B. über eine sehr schöne Musikgabe im herrlichen Palais Kinsky, Freyung 4, 5 mit unserem Bamberger als Dirigenten lieber mündlich!

Ihnen Beiden von uns Beiden beste Wünsche u. Grüße


Ihr
[signed:] H Schenker

24. IV. 33

© Transcription John Rothgeb and Heribert Esser, 2017



My dear Mr. van Hoboken, 1

The Brahms study is just now on its way to you, and I recognize here as well the opportunity to thank you most heartily for your assistance, understood both in the spiritual and in the material sense. I will properly express the abundant gratitude that is your due loudly and ceremoniously only in Free Composition – but that will entail the passage of a certain amount of time.

The surprise that I announced to you 2 is subject to a delay over which I have no {2} control; it will certainly come, however, and then I will return the Frankfurter inclosure 3 to you.

Even by Brahms's standards, his 8-8-and-5-5-monologue is not to be designated as a merely modest achievement and project; even these eleven pages were part of his genius, as shown by the light and art in the realization; and my own accomplishment in the explication, understood in the proper separation from Brahms, occupies, despite its mere nine leaves, a worthy place among my larger works as well.

I considered, on the other hand, my "Erinnerungen an Brahms" 4 (for Munich) far, far more modest. At every syllable, the great figure of the master held my pen at a most humble remove. {3} However minute the occasions may have been, his words to me were after all words from Brahms, seemingly altogether ordinary, yet somehow conspicuous, commanding, as otherwise a musician is unaccustomed to command them in speech, especially not with the significance that Brahms himself ascribed to them from art-experience.

We hope you may actually drop in on us in May! From me you shall find a beautiful collection of materials for you; regarding many other matters, including, for example, a very appealing music gift in the magnificent Palais Kinsky, at 4 Freyung, 5 with our Bamberger as conductor, preferably when we can talk in person!

Best wishes and greetings to you both from both of us,


Your
[signed:] H. Schenker

April 24, 1933

© Translation John Rothgeb and Heribert Esser, 2017



Mein lieber Herr van Hoboken ! 1

Gleichzeitig geht an Sie die Brahms-Studie ab u. ich nehme auch hier die Gelegenheit wahr, Ihnen herzlichst für Ihre Beihilfe zu danken, im ideelen wie materiellen Sinn verstanden! Den großen Dank statte ich erst im „freien Satz,“ laut u. feierlich ab, wie er sich gebührt ‒ doch bis dahin wird noch eine gewisse Zeit verstreichen.

Die Überraschung, die ich Ihnen ankündigte, 2 erfährt eine Verzögerung, gegen die ich keine {2} Mittel habe, sie kommt aber bestimmt. Dann gebe ich Ihnen die Frkf Beilage 3 zurück.

Selbst an Brahms gemessen ist sein 8-8- u. 5-5 Monolog wirklich nicht als eine nur bescheidene Leistung u. Unterhaltung zu bezeichnen, auch zu diesen 11 Seiten gehörte sein Genie, die Lust u. die Kraft der Ausführung seines Genies, u. meine eigene Leistung der Erklärung, im rechten Abstand von Brahms gedacht, nimmt auch, trotz nur 9 Spalten, auch unter meinen größeren Werken einen würdigen Platz ein.

Dagagen viel, viel bescheidener hielt ich meine „Erinnerungen an Brahms 4 (für München). Die große Gestalt des Meisters hielt meine Feder bei jeder Silbe in demutigster Entfernung. {3} So winzig die Veranlassungen gewesen sein mögen, so waren doch seine Worte zu mir doch Worte von Br., ganz unscheinbare, u. doch irgendwie aufhellend, führend, wie sonst ein Musiker sie nicht im Munde zu führen gewohnt ist, namentlich in der Bedeutung nicht, die Br. aus Kunsterfahrung selbst ihnen beimaß.

Hoffentlich lassen Sie sich wirklich im Mai bei uns sehen! Bei mir sollen Sie eine schöne Sammlung von Stoffen für Sie finden, über vieles Andere, wie z. B. über eine sehr schöne Musikgabe im herrlichen Palais Kinsky, Freyung 4, 5 mit unserem Bamberger als Dirigenten lieber mündlich!

Ihnen Beiden von uns Beiden beste Wünsche u. Grüße


Ihr
[signed:] H Schenker

24. IV. 33

© Transcription John Rothgeb and Heribert Esser, 2017



My dear Mr. van Hoboken, 1

The Brahms study is just now on its way to you, and I recognize here as well the opportunity to thank you most heartily for your assistance, understood both in the spiritual and in the material sense. I will properly express the abundant gratitude that is your due loudly and ceremoniously only in Free Composition – but that will entail the passage of a certain amount of time.

The surprise that I announced to you 2 is subject to a delay over which I have no {2} control; it will certainly come, however, and then I will return the Frankfurter inclosure 3 to you.

Even by Brahms's standards, his 8-8-and-5-5-monologue is not to be designated as a merely modest achievement and project; even these eleven pages were part of his genius, as shown by the light and art in the realization; and my own accomplishment in the explication, understood in the proper separation from Brahms, occupies, despite its mere nine leaves, a worthy place among my larger works as well.

I considered, on the other hand, my "Erinnerungen an Brahms" 4 (for Munich) far, far more modest. At every syllable, the great figure of the master held my pen at a most humble remove. {3} However minute the occasions may have been, his words to me were after all words from Brahms, seemingly altogether ordinary, yet somehow conspicuous, commanding, as otherwise a musician is unaccustomed to command them in speech, especially not with the significance that Brahms himself ascribed to them from art-experience.

We hope you may actually drop in on us in May! From me you shall find a beautiful collection of materials for you; regarding many other matters, including, for example, a very appealing music gift in the magnificent Palais Kinsky, at 4 Freyung, 5 with our Bamberger as conductor, preferably when we can talk in person!

Best wishes and greetings to you both from both of us,


Your
[signed:] H. Schenker

April 24, 1933

© Translation John Rothgeb and Heribert Esser, 2017

Footnotes

1 Writing of this letter is recorded in Schenker's diary at OJ 4/6, p. 3828, April 24, 1933: "Postweg: Brahms für Hoboken, Rinn, Rosl. — An v. Hoboken (Br.): gebe meiner Erläuterung Wert, damit sie den Cynismus u. die S. 1300 überwinde, erwähne dagegen der „Erinnerungen“ in einem leichteren Tone. Zupfe Bambergers Leistung an usw." ("Trip to the Post Office: Brahms for Hoboken, Rinn, Rosl. — To Hoboken (letter): I clarify for him the value of my explanation, so that it will overcome his cynicism and the 1,300 shillings; on the other hand, I mention the "Recollections" in a gentler tone. I hint at Bamberger’s achievement, etc.").

2 See OJ 89/6, [4].

3 An article (unidentified) in the Frankfurter Zeitung that Hoboken sent to Schenker in March, which Schenker deferred reading until later (OJ 89/6, [4]), and on which he commented in his letter of May 3 (OJ 89/6, [6]).

4 Heinrich Schenker, "Erinnerungen an Johannes Brahms," Deutsche Zeitschrift: Monatshefte für eine deutsche Volkskultur (formerly Der Kunstwart) 46 (May 1933), 475‒82, published by the Callwey Verlag in Munich.

5 On April 22‒23, 1933, at the Palais Kinsky, Carl Bamberger conducted a Bach Brandenburg concerto and a cantata, a harpsichord concerto by Haydn, and a Divertimento in D major by Mozart (probably K. 334, on account of its famous Minuet, which is mentioned by the reviewer: see "Kleine Chronik. Kammerkonzert im Palais Kinsky," Neue freie Presse, No. 24648, April 26, 1933, evening edition, p. 2). The event is reported in Schenker's diary ‒ Hoboken was not in Vienna for it.

Commentary

Rights Holder
Heirs of Henrich Schenker, deemed to be in the public domain.
License
All reasonable steps have been taken to locate the heirs of Heinrich Schenker. Any claim to intellectual rights on this document should be addressed to the Schenker Correspondence Project, Faculty of Music, University of Cambridge, at schenkercorrespondence [at] mus (dot) cam (dot) ac (dot) uk.
Format
3p letter, Bogen format, holograph salutation, message, valediction, and signature
Provenance
Hoboken, Anthony van ([document date]-1983)--Schneider, Hans (19??-2007)--University of California, Riverside (2007--)

Digital version created: 2017-12-15
Last updated: 2012-10-08