[The lesson reports for Angi Elias in the original are written continuously, without paragraph breaks or separating punctuation. They have been separated here in the interests of legibility.]

Elias:

op.106 begonnen. op. 10, 2 1 wiederholt, Haydn Cismoll, letzter Satz, gelesen.

10.X. Abschluss des 1. Teiles von op. 106, dazu Theoretisches über ĉĂ u. das Verhältnis von Tonalität u. Form. Vergleiche mit Bachs Partita, 2 Präludium, Ale- {7} mande [sic] u. mit Schuberts Walzer

29.X. Urlinie u. Klischées bis zum 2. Ged. in op. 106, 3 dazu Betrachtungen von Bülow, Riemann, Nagel.

8.XI. Brahms Walzer: 4 Urlinie-Bilder von No 1, 2, 3 u. Vortrag. Gelesen: Haydn, Ddur-Sonate, Peters I, 1. Satz; 5 Brahms Walzer No 4 u. 5.

17.XI. op. 106 fortgesetzt; Haydn Ddur Sonate, Adagio. 6

19.XI. op. 106 Bild der Durchführung. 7

22.XI. Brahms Walzer No 6. 8

24.XI. Wiederholung des 1. Satzes op. 106; Haydn-Sonate, letzter Satz. 9

28.XI. Weitere Bilder zu den Brahms Walzern. 10

1.XII. op. 106: Scherzo begonnen, Winke zur Urlinie. 1. Satz schon flüssig.

3.XII. Erster Bildversuch des Scherzo. 11

10.XII. Scherzo-Trio Bilder. 12

© Transcription Robert Kosovsky, 2007

[The lesson reports for Angi Elias in the original are written continuously, without paragraph breaks or separating punctuation. They have been separated here in the interests of legibility.]

Elias:

Op. 106 begun. Op. 10, No. 2 1 repeated. Haydn Cě minor, last movement, read.

October 10. Conclusion of the first part of Op. 106, and in relation to it, theoretical points on ĉĂ and the relationship of tonality and form. I compare to the Bach Partita, 2 Prelude and Allemande, {7} and to the Schubert Waltz.

October 29. Urlinie graph and Klischées up to the second theme in Op. 106, 3 and in relation to it, observations by Bülow, Riemann, Nagel.

November 8. Brahms Waltzes: 4 Urlinie graphs of Nos. 1, 2, 3 and performance. Read: Haydn Sonata in D major, Peters I, first movement; 5 Brahms Waltzes Nos. 4 and 5.

November 17. Op. 106 continued; Haydn Sonata in D major, Adagio. 6

November 19. Op. 106 graph of the development section. 7

November 22. Brahms Waltz No. 6. 8

November 24. Repetition of the first movement of Op. 106; Haydn Sonata, last movement. 9

November 28. Further graphs of the Brahms Waltzes. 10

December 1. Op. 106: Scherzo begun, tips on the Urlinie. First movement already fluent.

December 3. First attempt at a graph of the Scherzo 11

December 10. Graphs of the Scherzo-Trio. 12

© Translation Alan Dodson, 2017

[The lesson reports for Angi Elias in the original are written continuously, without paragraph breaks or separating punctuation. They have been separated here in the interests of legibility.]

Elias:

op.106 begonnen. op. 10, 2 1 wiederholt, Haydn Cismoll, letzter Satz, gelesen.

10.X. Abschluss des 1. Teiles von op. 106, dazu Theoretisches über ĉĂ u. das Verhältnis von Tonalität u. Form. Vergleiche mit Bachs Partita, 2 Präludium, Ale- {7} mande [sic] u. mit Schuberts Walzer

29.X. Urlinie u. Klischées bis zum 2. Ged. in op. 106, 3 dazu Betrachtungen von Bülow, Riemann, Nagel.

8.XI. Brahms Walzer: 4 Urlinie-Bilder von No 1, 2, 3 u. Vortrag. Gelesen: Haydn, Ddur-Sonate, Peters I, 1. Satz; 5 Brahms Walzer No 4 u. 5.

17.XI. op. 106 fortgesetzt; Haydn Ddur Sonate, Adagio. 6

19.XI. op. 106 Bild der Durchführung. 7

22.XI. Brahms Walzer No 6. 8

24.XI. Wiederholung des 1. Satzes op. 106; Haydn-Sonate, letzter Satz. 9

28.XI. Weitere Bilder zu den Brahms Walzern. 10

1.XII. op. 106: Scherzo begonnen, Winke zur Urlinie. 1. Satz schon flüssig.

3.XII. Erster Bildversuch des Scherzo. 11

10.XII. Scherzo-Trio Bilder. 12

© Transcription Robert Kosovsky, 2007

[The lesson reports for Angi Elias in the original are written continuously, without paragraph breaks or separating punctuation. They have been separated here in the interests of legibility.]

Elias:

Op. 106 begun. Op. 10, No. 2 1 repeated. Haydn Cě minor, last movement, read.

October 10. Conclusion of the first part of Op. 106, and in relation to it, theoretical points on ĉĂ and the relationship of tonality and form. I compare to the Bach Partita, 2 Prelude and Allemande, {7} and to the Schubert Waltz.

October 29. Urlinie graph and Klischées up to the second theme in Op. 106, 3 and in relation to it, observations by Bülow, Riemann, Nagel.

November 8. Brahms Waltzes: 4 Urlinie graphs of Nos. 1, 2, 3 and performance. Read: Haydn Sonata in D major, Peters I, first movement; 5 Brahms Waltzes Nos. 4 and 5.

November 17. Op. 106 continued; Haydn Sonata in D major, Adagio. 6

November 19. Op. 106 graph of the development section. 7

November 22. Brahms Waltz No. 6. 8

November 24. Repetition of the first movement of Op. 106; Haydn Sonata, last movement. 9

November 28. Further graphs of the Brahms Waltzes. 10

December 1. Op. 106: Scherzo begun, tips on the Urlinie. First movement already fluent.

December 3. First attempt at a graph of the Scherzo 11

December 10. Graphs of the Scherzo-Trio. 12

© Translation Alan Dodson, 2017

Footnotes

1 Probably Beethoven’s Sonata Op. 10 No. 2, a piece Elias studied the previous year. Her most recent lesson on Chopin’s Etude Op. 10 No. 2 was during the 1917/18 season. — This first entry is undated. The most likely dates for the lesson to have taken place are October 1, 4, 6, or 8. Elias seems to have signed up for three lessons per week, on Mondays, Wednesdays, and Saturdays, but with many omissions/absences and several substitutions.

2 Probably Partita No. 1 in Bę major, on which another pupil (Brünauer) had just received a lesson three days earlier. In a series of sketches that Schenker appears to have prepared the following week (OC 69/4–8), he graphs both the Prelude and Allemande as ĉ -lines. Cf. Schenker’s diary, October 15: “An op. 106 u. dem Präludium der Partita u. Allemande.” (“[Work] on Op. 106 and the Prelude of the Partita and Allemande.”) October 17: “Allemande zuende.” (“Allemande finished.”)

3 OC 65/12, Elias’s foreground graph of the first 161 measures of this movement, resembles Schenker’s “Urlinie-Tafel” graphs in its level of detail, while OC 65/4, her two-level graph of the first 134 bars, is labelled as “I, Klischees.” This lesson appears to have centered on bars 1–61 of these two documents, comprising the first theme (“Gruppe I”) and transition (“Modulationspartie”) in Schenker’s earlier analysis of the movement’s form (OC 65/64–65). See Nicholas Marston, Heinrich Schenker and Beethoven’s ‘Hammerklavier’ Sonata (Ashgate, 2013), pp. 36–42 and 149–50.

4 This was the first of twenty lessons centering on graphs of Brahms’s Waltzes Op. 39 that Elias received during the 1924/25 and 1925/26 seasons. A notebook containing Elias’s graphs of the entire opus, with corrections in Schenker’s hand, survives as OC 34/312.

5 The score cited here (OC score 73) includes two sonatas in D major, namely Hob. XVI/19 and 37. The lessonbook entry for November 17 suggests that Elias played the former.

6 Of the two sonatas in D major found in the score cited in the lessonbook entry from November 8, only one includes an Adagio movement (“Adagio, ma non troppo”): Hob. XVI/19.

7 See Elias’s foreground graph of the movement (OC 65/12–14), bars 120–226.

8 See footnote in lessonbook entry from November 8.

9 Hob. XVI/19. See lessonbook entries from November 8 and 17.

10 See footnote in lessonbook entry from November 8.

11 There are two graphs of this movement in Elias’s hand: OC 65/24 (foreground) and OC 65/25 (reduction).

12 See footnote in lessonbook entry from December 3.